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Nigeria Records 28 Deals Worth $1bn in H1 2021

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28 Deals Worth $1bn

By Modupe Gbadeyanka

A new report from Baker McKenzie has indicated that in the first half of 2021, Nigeria and South Africa recorded a surge in mergers and acquisitions (M&A).

However, Kenya, another key economy in Sub-Saharan Africa, witnessed a slight decline in the period under consideration, according to an analysis of Refinitiv data.

It was revealed that 28 deals worth $1 billion were recorded in Nigeria in H1 2021, indicating that by transaction volume, it rose by 17 per cent and by value, it soared by 267 per cent.

Refinitiv data reveals that domestic transactions decreased by 15 per cent to 11 deals, but deal value increased by 342 per cent year-on-year to $726 million.

Also, cross-border transactions increased by 13 per cent to 17 deals, with deal value rising by 8 per cent to $296 million, with financial companies being the prime targets for inbound deals at four transactions, showing a 100 per cent increase y-o-y and deal value of $10 million, a 327 per cent increase year on year.

Once again, the US served as the primary investor for Nigerian companies, with four deals worth $13 million. The largest inbound deal into Nigeria in H1 2021 was Mwendo Holdings BV’s (South Africa) $182 million acquisition of Blue Lake Ventures Ltd (Media and Entertainment), announced in June 2021.

In a statement obtained by Business Post, the Head of Africa for Baker McKenzie, Mr Wildu du Plessis, stated that while investors from the US have shown interest in Africa for some time, under President Joe Biden, the general consensus is that US engagement with African countries is focusing on strengthening relationships in a strategic, co-operative way.

It has been noted that Mr Biden will continue with successful bipartisan programmes implemented by his predecessors, as well as further encouraging US trade and investment in the continent.

Considering that American companies were the top investors in two of Africa’s largest economies in the first half of 2021, dealmakers are clearly comfortable with Biden’s approach to Africa.

South Africa

The value of M&A transactions in South Africa in H1 2021 amounted to $52 billion, with 169 deals announced in the period. Compared to the first half of 2020, transactions volumes decreased by 8 per cent but deal value increased by 958 per cent in the first half of 2021.

Refinitiv data showed that the volume of domestic transactions increased slightly to 80 deals, a 10 per cent increase y-o-y. Domestic transactions in South Africa in H1 21 were worth $46.7 billion, a dramatic 2,148 per cent increase. Further, cross-border transactions increased 17 per cent to 89 deals, with deal value surging 251 per cent to $5.4 billion.

According to Marc Yudaken, Partner in the Corporate/M&A Practice at Baker McKenzie in Johannesburg, “Despite the excellent start to 2021, the unrest in South Africa threatens to impact the positive strides made in terms of foreign investment into the country in the first six months of this year.

“For the sake of South Africa’s post-pandemic recovery, the turmoil engulfing our country has to be ended before investors are forced to seek less risky alternatives.

“Foreign investors will only ramp up their investments if they are confident their assets are safe. They need political and economic certainty and must have confidence that there is rule of law in the countries in which they invest.”

High technology companies were the primary targets for inbound deals in South Africa, with 12 transactions, representing 200 per cent in deal volume and a deal value of $160 million, an increase of 1,997 per cent when compared to the same period last year.

“It’s no secret that African consumers have shown a growing reliance on technology across multiple platforms, even well before the pandemic struck.

“The growth of the digital economy across the continent has naturally been accelerated by the pandemic and this unabated demand for technology has caused extensive cross-sector disruption, with the financial, energy, transport, retail, health and agricultural sectors all seeking opportunities to expand their tech infrastructure in order to acquire the necessary skills and innovation needed to keep up with demand.

“Fintech is also a popular tech sector for investment across Africa and specifically in South Africa, Kenya and Nigeria, with health-tech, mobility and agritech also attracting growing interest,” Mr du Plessis noted.

“It looks like South Africa is leading the way in terms of high-value deals in the tech sector and we expect this tech M&A trend to continue as the continent gears up to operate in the post-pandemic new normal,” he added.

The United States was the primary investor for South African companies, with 16 deals (an increase of 60 per cent) valued at $496 million (an increase of 340 per cent).

This was helped by TPG Capital LP’s $200 million acquisition of Airtel Africa Plc-Mobile (telecommunications) announced in March 2021. The largest inbound deal in H1 2021 was Temasek Holdings (Pte) Ltd’s (Singapore) $500 million acquisition of Leapfrog Investments (financials), also announced in March 2021.

Kenya

In H1 2021, deal-making in Kenya decreased by 14 per cent with 18 deals in the period and deal value decreased by 96 per cent to $11 million.

Financial companies were the prime targets for inbound deals with five transactions, representing a 150 per cent increase, with deals valued at $11 million, a 78 per cent decrease.

Nigeria served as the primary investor for Kenyan companies with three deals. The largest inbound deal into Kenya in H1 2021 was Liberty Holdings Ltd’s (South Africa) $8 million acquisition of Liberty Kenya Holdings Plc (insurance), announced in March 2021.

In its reaction to this, Mr Du Plessis said the decrease in M&A volume and value in Kenya in H1 2021 is expected to be temporary as the country continues to implement pandemic recovery policies, including a vaccine rollout strategy for the adult population with a planned completion date of mid-2022.

“The country’s reputation as an East African investment hub, in addition to its strong technology capabilities, means that it is just a matter of time before Kenya takes up its rightful place as one of the top target countries for technology transactions in Africa,” he submitted.

Modupe Gbadeyanka is a fast-rising journalist with Business Post Nigeria. Her passion for journalism is amazing. She is willing to learn more with a view to becoming one of the best pen-pushers in Nigeria. Her role models are the duo of CNN's Richard Quest and Christiane Amanpour.

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Economy

Nigeria’s Oil, Gas Export Sales Rise 180.3%

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Gas Export Sales

By Adedapo Adesanya

Nigeria witnessed a 180.3 per cent increase in the total crude oil and gas export sales in May, standing at $219.8 million compared to the value in April 2021.

The Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) disclosed in its Monthly Financial and Operation Report (MFOR) for the month of May 2021 that crude oil export sales contributed $181.2 million (82.5 per cent) of the dollar transactions compared with $4.22 million contributions in the previous month.

Similarly, the export gas sales component stood at $38.6 million in May.

The MFOR showed that between May 2020 and May 2021, the corporation exported crude oil and gas worth $1.6 billion, while natural gas production in the country increased by 6.2 per cent at 222.23 billion cubic feet in May 2021.

The report noted that, “In the gas sector, natural gas production in the month under review increased by 6.19 per cent to 222.23 billion cubic feet (bcf) compared with output in the previous month, translating to an average production of 7,177.53 million standard cubic feet (mmscf) of gas per day.

“For the period May 2020 to May 2021, a total of 2,898.34 bcf of gas was produced, representing an average daily production of 7,322.94mmscf during the period.

“Period-to-date production from Joint Ventures (JVs), Production Sharing Contracts (PSCs) and Nigerian Petroleum Development Company (NPDC) contributed about 60.94 per cent, 20.04 per cent and 18.99 per cent respectively.

“Out of the 216.29 bcf of gas produced in May 2021, a total of 133.56 bcf was commercialised, consisting of 44.02bcf and 89.54 bcf for the domestic and export markets respectively.”

This translates to a total supply of 1,419.83 mmscfd of gas to the domestic market and 2,893.66 mmscfd to the export market for the month.

This, it said, implied that 61.8 per cent of the average daily gas produced was commercialised, while the balance of 38.2 per cent was either re-injected, used as upstream fuel or flared.

In the downstream sector, the report indicated that the Petroleum Products Marketing Company (PPMC), a downstream subsidiary of the NNPC, posted a total sum of N295.7 billion from the sales of petroleum products in the month under review, compared with N220.1 billion sales in April 2021.

“Total revenues generated from the sales of petroleum products for the period of May 2020 to May 2021 stood at N2.345 trillion where Premium Motor Spirit (PMS),  also known as petrol, contributed about 99.6 per cent of the total sales with a value of N2.336 trillion.

“In terms of volume, the figure translated to a total of 2.241 billion litres of white products sold and distributed by PPMC in the month under review, compared with 1.673 billion litres in the month of April

“Total sales of petroleum products for the period of May 2020 to May 2021 stood at 18.651 billion litres and PMS accounted for 99.69 per cent of total volume,’’ it added.

The state oil company noted that in May, 64 pipeline points were vandalised representing a 39.1 per cent increase from the 46 points recorded in April 2021.

It noted that the Port Harcourt area accounted for 65 per cent, while Mosimi and Kaduna Areas accounted for 30 per cent and five per cent respectively of the vandalised points.

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Economy

Ngige Confirms FG Borrows from World Bank, Others to Pay Salaries

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Ngige FG Borrows to pay salaries

By Dipo Olowookere

Minister of Labour and Employment, Mr Chris Ngige, has confirmed that the federal government under President Muhammadu Buhari borrows funds from international sources to pay salaries of workers because of a shortfall in the country’s revenue.

Mr Ngige, while speaking on Sunday night on a programme monitored by Business Post on Channels TV, stated that the government takes borrowed funds from foreign institutions like the World Bank to offset some recurrent expenditures.

Last week, after the Senate resumed plenary, a letter from President Buhari requesting approval for fresh offshore loans of $4 billion and €710 million was read to the lawmakers by their head, Mr Ahmad Lawan.

This generated different reactions from various quarters. The government defended the borrowings, arguing that they were being used to develop the country, especially in the area of infrastructure.

In the midst of these, the Debt Management Office (DMO) said the nation’s total debt at the second quarter of this year stood at N35.5 trillion.

Some Nigerians had argued that the penchant for this government for borrowing was becoming unbearable, especially when the country was using about 98 per cent of generated revenue to service the debts.

But the government has maintained that the loans being taken by the federal government were not above the limit and that the projects being executed with the funds, including rails, were capable of generating revenue to repay them.

Next month, Nigeria will borrow between $3 billion and $6.2 billion from local and international investors through the sale of Eurobonds, adding to the debts already on ground.

While speaking on Sunday Politics anchored by Mr Seun Okinbaloye, Mr Ngige admitted that the central government truly takes funds from international lenders to pay workers.

“Talk in terms of something like the residency training funds; that money was appropriated in 2021. It was delayed because the President signed the supplementary budget [late] but because the resident doctors did not want to listen, they wanted the money to go into their accounts immediately, according to them.

“I told them, no, when the budget office explained [that] we don’t have this cash, the borrowing agencies [like the] World Bank and the rest will give us this money through the CBN (Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) in Dollars and we change it to give to you, to pay you and others that are involved because we are funding the budget through some deficits.

“So, I will tell the budget office, expedite action, do this in one week because this is an emergency, these people are not accountants, they don’t understand and we put it down and the budget office rises up to the occasion, works day and night and put it out, Minister of Finance approves, AIE (Authority to Incur Expenditure) and the N4.8 billion is there, waiting to be disbursed.

“Give us the names of those to be paid and they bring (sic) their names through the post-graduate medical college and when the names come (sic), their parent body, which is the Ministry of Health discovered that there were names that were no resident doctors. So, how do you pay?

“Okay, they submitted 8,000 names, they have cleaned them down to 5,800, which means about 2,000+ are not resident doctors. How do you pay them?

“Further investigation, according to the Minister of Health, revealed that some of them are medical officers, senior medical officers, principal medical officers, who hold full appointments, some of them are not resident doctors but because they have been captured in resident doctors association, they want them to be paid; that’s wrong.

“We tell (sic) resident doctors, ‘give them more time to clean up’. They are cleaning it (the list) up, the money is there. So, I expected the resident doctors to go and help them clean up and submit the authentic list,” Mr Ngige said on the programme.

On Monday, while speaking on Politics Today with the same anchor, the spokesman of the President, Mr Femi Adesina, while asked if the government borrows for consumption, answered that the larger part of the borrowed funds is used for critical projects capable of boosting the economy.

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Economy

Selloffs Resume at Nigerian Exchange as Investors Lose N19bn

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Customs Street Nigerian Stock Exchange

By Dipo Olowookere

The first trading session on the floor of the Nigerian Exchange (NGX) Limited was on a negative note as the market went down by 0.10 per cent on Monday.

Selloffs mostly in consumer goods and banking stocks influenced the decline recorded at the exchange yesterday.

Business Post reports that the insurance index went down by 0.70 per cent, the banking counter declined by 0.27 per cent, while the consumer goods space shed 0.16 per cent.

But the industrial goods index appreciated yesterday by 0.13 per cent, while the oil/gas sector improved by 0.08 per cent.

At the close of transactions, the All-Share Index (ASI) decreased by 37.45 points to 38,906.42 points from 38,943.87 points, while the market capitalisation reduced by N19 billion to N20.271 trillion from N20.290 trillion.

The market breadth closed at equilibrium yesterday as there were 19 price gainers and 19 price losers when trading activities were stopped for the session at 2:30 pm.

Sitting on top of the losers’ chart was SCOA Nigeria as its share price went down by 9.43 per cent to settle at 96 kobo and was followed by Veritas Kapital, which lost 8.70 per cent to trade at 21 kobo.

Linkage Assurance depreciated by 6.56 per cent to 57 kobo, PZ Cussons slipped by 5.98 per cent to N5.50, while Cornerstone Insurance went down by 5.77 per cent to 49 kobo.

On the gainers’ log, Consolidated Hallmark Insurance sat on top after its equity price increased by 9.62 per cent to 57 kobo, followed by Chams, which gained 9.52 per cent to trade at 23 kobo.

Courtville appreciated by 6.90 per cent to 31 kobo, Wema Bank grew by 3.95 per cent to 79 kobo, while NAHCO increased by 3.62 per cent to N3.15.

A look at the activity chart showed that the trading volume rose by 23.12 per cent to 191.0 million units from 155.1 million units, the trading value increased by 20.92 per cent to N2.4 billion from N2.0 billion, while the number of deals leapt by 19.13 per cent to 3,462 deals from 2,906 deals.

Eko Corporation was the most active stock with the sale of 40.0 million units worth N231.6 million, UBA traded 10.8 million units valued at N82.2 million, Transcorp sold 9.8 million units for N8.9 million, Sovereign Trust Insurance transacted 9.6 million units valued at N2.3 million, while Fidelity Bank traded 9.3 million units worth N22.2 million.

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