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Sound Sultan: The Poetic Ambassador on Migration UN Never Had

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Sound Sultan

By Segun Adesokan

Motherland, referring to Nigeria in his song, at the time of its release, was timely and its messages even till the present day is rich and timeless as it could be passed off as an immigrant travel guide.

The early part of the song had reminded us about how Chinedu had borrowed some money to fund his trip to Chicago. It further adds: how Nnamdi had also sold off his car to facilitate the trip of a beloved to America. In the middle of it all is also the emotionally drained lover or spouse left behind, whose wellbeing and fragile mind is left hanging in the balance, sadly in some instances, some partners never return.

The song perhaps appears to have critically observed the obsession of many immigrants whose inordinate or misplaced quest for survival believes that immigrating to the West or other European countries is a critical means by which survival is sought, hence Sound Sultan’s Motherland came in handy: offering some counsel, suggesting that sometimes, a sojourner may have to beat a retreat by returning to his ancestral home, Motherland, given the fact that sometimes, in a bid to survive in a foreign land, the unpredictability of such adventures may unavoidably require one to do so.

As often the case with many immigrants from Nigeria and by extension many others from African countries, who had at one time or the other undertaken such adventurous trips in search of greener pasture abroad, even the period leading to their departure also comes at a great cost and sacrifices as some families sell off assets and other prized possessions to fund such trips, unsure whether the risk would eventually pay off or not.

While the craze in search of the golden fleece rage on, some Africans in their desperation may have also thrown caution in the air, leading to situations where thousands have reportedly died in the wake of risky voyages across Mediterranean or Sahara wastelands, as hundreds have also fallen prey to wild beasts, transnational armed syndicate and human traffickers who deal in drugs and séx slaves, having promised many unsuspecting victims an elusive Eldorado life, waiting for them in Europe.

Many African households have believed some of these false narratives built into their psyche for many years and it has become so difficult to undo.

The late singer was never opposed to the idea of people seeking better opportunities or greener pastures outside the country, but rather also reminds them about home and the need for them to apply cautious optimism where applicable, in their quest to travelling overseas.

Notwithstanding, the home would still be home regardless of the prevailing circumstance which may have forcibly led to one’s uneventful return.

This writer believes late Olarewaju Fasasi, fondly called Sound Sultan, as a social crusader, an iconic singer using his musical crafts as a vehicle to remind us about the need to be introspective, also feels compelled to note that Motherland, mirroring the life of most immigrants and some of the challenges often associated with it, brings to the fore also a social problem and the need for concerned international organisations like UN and its relevant agencies to do more in terms of advocacy and policies in reversing the tales of woes of many migrants.

Though UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development recognizes for the first time the contribution of migration to its sustainable development, thus, 11 out of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) contain targets and indicators relevant to migration or mobility for which parts of its Agenda’s core principle is to “leave no one behind,” not even migrants.

The SDGs’ central reference to migration is made in some of its major targets, which is to facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies.

Other targets directly related to migration mention trafficking, remittances, international student mobility, and more. Moreover, migration is indirectly relevant to many more cross-cutting targets.

UN, more recently, through International Organization on Migration, a leading partner on the inter-governmental organisation in the field of migration works to ensure the orderly and humane management of migration, to promote international cooperation on migration issues, to assist in the search for practical solutions to migration problems and to provide humanitarian assistance to migrants in need, including refugees and internally displaced people.

 In 2016, IOM entered into an agreement with the United Nations, becoming one of its specialized agencies.

However, the above plans and efforts of UN appear commendable but today’s realities in some part of Europe and other Asian countries, judging by their immigration policies at present largely remains a far cry from the much-advertised SDG’s policies.

While many Africans battle so hard to grapple with harsh realities and hostilities of their host countries ranging from racism, prejudice, little or too rigid legal documentation processes for immigrants, and biting chances of economic survival, many have also become susceptible to illegal drug dealings which in most cases often result in cruel fate or even avoidable deaths.

The sad news on the passing of Sound Sultan, one of Nigeria’s notable songwriter, artist, producer, and comedian, who a few weeks ago was reported to have lost the battle to a cancerous related aliment around the throat, brings with it feelings of pain, grief, and national loss.

By national loss, Nigeria just lost a voice and a social crusader reputed for his numerous campaigns against bad governance, injustice, corruption, and bad leadership a major clog in the wheel of Nigeria’s progress. He will fondly be remembered for his many statesmanly roles towards mobilizing the citizens through his several songs on how to constructively hold them accountable to their constitutional functions.

To the memory of the late singer, President Muhammadu Buhari also penned a glowing tribute to him for his contribution to basketball development in Nigeria.

He was even reported to have co-owned a basketball team. D’Tigers, the Nigerian men basketball national team, would also honour the late singer by wearing T-shirts bearing the late singer’s name and image on it, for his roles in promoting the sports.

Coincidentally, his death would also leave a lasting memory following D’Tiger’s phenomenal triumph over the US men basketball national team, a feat no African team had ever done, the same day he was said to have died.

The Motherland crooner died at age 44 in the US and his remains have since been buried in the US, same day, according to Islamic rites, leaving behind his three kids and his beloved wife.

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UniAbuja Student Wins N1.5m in Boomplay Campus Music Star Season 1

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Boomplay Campus Music Star

By Modupe Gbadeyanka

A 200 level student of the University of Abuja (UniAbuja), Ms Emmanuella Adejoh, has emerged as the winner of the Boomplay Campus Music Star season one.

The Guidance and Counselling budding singer won the grand prize of the competition, N1.5 million, due to her outstanding performance, according to the judges.

She defeated the other contestants, especially those that made it into the top three, to clinch the coveted prize.

The first-runner up was Iroenyenwa Nzubechukwu, a student of the Federal Polytechnic Nekede Owerri, studying Mass Communications; and the second runner-up, Godswill Sarah Iruoma, a student of Yaba College of Technology, Lagos, studying Hospitality Management.

It was gathered that the music hunt contest had the trio of Teni, OAP Do2dtun, and a renowned music producer Philkeyz as the judges.

They were involved in accessing the several entries received for the completion and pruned them to 10, who made it to the finale.

The rookie artistes underwent a series of activities, including a master class training session, a team bonding exercise, press conference and community display of their talents.

The Boomplay Campus Music Star competition was created to discover loads of talents in the country and provide them with a platform to showcase their skills.

The official partners of the programme were SHAREit Lite and Vskit, while the media partner was Trace TV.

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Legendary Singer Dayo Kujore Dies at LASUTH

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Dayo Kujore

By Aduragbemi Omiyale

A legendary Juju musician in Nigeria, Dayo Kujore, has died at the age of 63 at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH) Ikeja, Lagos.

The singer, according to reports quoting his daughter, Ayinke Kujore, died on Monday morning at the hospital.

The Soko Extra crooner, who started playing the guitar at 10 and rose to become popular for creating a new tune from the Juju genre called Soko music, gave up the ghost after a brief illness.

However, his family is yet to formally state the actual illness that claimed the life of the veteran Juju musician today.

The report of his death is already generating reactions from stakeholders in the Nigerian music industry, with friends, colleagues and fans sending their condolences.

Dayo Kujore serenaded lovers of good music during his lifetime with albums like Soko Xtra, Joy, Easy Life, Wisdom, Elevation and Superjet, which turned him into a household name in 1991, though his first album was released in 1977 and was titled Ha! Jesu Mbe.

Dayo Kujore1

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Veteran Nollywood Actress Iyabo Oko is Dead

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Iyabo Oko

By Modupe Gbadeyanka

A veteran actress in the Yoruba movie industry, Sidikat Odukanwi, otherwise known as Iyabo Oko, has passed on.

One of the children of the deceased, Ms Bisi Aisha, who is military personnel, confirmed the death of her mother.

“May ur soul Rest In Peace mummy,” she posted on one of her social media pages.

Also, one of the colleagues of Iyabo Oko in Nollywood, Mrs Foluke Daramola-Salako, posted on Instagram the death of the prolific actress, who reportedly breathed her last Wednesday evening.

Iyabo Oko died after battling with an illness, which kept her away from movie locations. She finally succumbed to the illness yesterday.

“And finally, we lost her.. rip Iyabo Oko, we did our best but God knows best,” Foluke Daramola-Salako wrote.

In 2021, when one of the daughters of the late actress, Olamide, revealed that her mother was diagnosed with ischaemic stroke about five years ago but kept her health issues away from the public, some thespians rallied around with financial assistance to get her back on her feet.

Pictures of her on the internet showed the state of her health and spurred more reactions from fans and colleagues. She was treated and later discharged from the hospital. Thereafter, not much was heard about the 61-year-old actress until her death on Wednesday.

Iyabo Oko was born on November 15, 1960, in the Iwo Local Government Area of Osun State. She acted in several films before bowing out the stage.

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