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Umi Blockchain Ecosystem: Instant Transfers, Smart Contracts And Profitable Staking

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Umi Blockchain Ecosystem

Thus far, the number of issued cryptocurrencies and digital tokens has exceeded 7,000 and in this ocean of crypto projects, it is difficult for investors to recognize promising services at an early stage of development, however, at the same time, investments at this stage maximize the profits.

UMI is one of the young projects created at the crossroad of DeFi and digital assets trends, which draws attention not only by its unique functionality but also by its future plans.

UMI is a universal monetary instrument that allows users to make instant, secure and free financial transfers, as well as earn crypto through profitable staking.

In addition, UMI is a full-fledged blockchain platform capable of executing smart contracts of any complexity. Let’s take a closer look at UMI capabilities.

Watch a video about UMI below:

Transactions

The UMI network can execute approximately 4500 transactions per second. This significantly exceeds the capacity of most other blockchains, including fundamental ones like Bitcoin or Ethereum.

The UMI Mainnet was launched in the summer of 2020 and it’s continuously improving. In the future, the UMI team will roll out an update that will increase enough high capacity to execute 10,000 transactions per second. This brings the UMI platform closer to the transactional conductance of major payment systems such as VISA and MasterCard.

The UMI developers also have a long-term goal – to achieve the capacity of 1 million transactions per second. Although this sounds too ambitious, there is a chance to reach it in the long run, and here is why.

Transaction UMI

First, the UMI network operates on an improved version of the Proof-of-Authority consensus (PoA consensus characteristics will be discussed in detail later in the article).

Secondly, such scaling can be achieved through the optimization of programming languages ​​and smart contracts, as well as with such tools as Kubernetes.

Finally, upgrades of the UMI network can be carried out faster and with less effort with the planned changes in the internal architecture of the ecosystem.

Another planned function of the UMI ecosystem payment service also appears to be very promising – offline transactions.

Other blockchain systems focus on transactions exclusively via the Internet, while in the UMI ecosystem, the procedure of sending transactions can be carried out without access to the World Wide Web using ordinary SMS or other communication methods.

For example, the length of a UMI transaction is 150 bytes. That’s 1200 bits of information. The standard length of an SMS is 1120 bits (140 bytes), which means that only 2 SMS are required to send a transfer through the UMI blockchain. This is convenient if the transfer needs to be sent urgently, and the Internet is temporarily not accessible.

Technically, the UMI ecosystem is already capable of sending offline transactions without the Internet connection, but the service for initiating transfers has not been launched yet. The UMI team is currently developing it.

Although, the main feature of the UMI blockchain is not the network’s capacity, the absence of any fees. This has been achieved by the unique technology on which the ecosystem is built, as well as a different economic model in comparison to other popular cryptocurrencies.

Technology

The UMI blockchain is based on Proof-of-Authority technology, a concept created by Ethereum co-founder Gavin Wood.

The difference between PoA and the popular Proof-of-Work algorithms (which Bitcoin runs on) or Proof-of-Stake (Ethereum plans to switch to PoS) is that in the PoA network there is no place for the contest between the miners and forgers for the right to generate a block and get a reward.

The generation of blocks, and most importantly, their integration into the blockchain, is handled by trusted nodes – ‘master nodes’. In the UMI network, master nodes are large authorized nodes that meet stringent speed requirements. This feature significantly increases the network’s capacity.

However, the original concept of PoA also has its drawbacks. The original PoA model assumes that ordinary users cannot influence the operating mechanics of the system, and only trusted nodes have the right to confirm transactions and record them in the blockchain, and those usually belong to one organization or affiliated companies. These factors increase the risks of network centralization, which deprives the cryptocurrency of its main value – decentralization – and make it little different from other already existing traditional payment systems.

In order to avoid the risk of network centralization, the nodes in the UMI blockchain are divided into two types – ‘master nodes’, that integrate blocks into the blockchain, and ‘validator nodes’ that validate the blocks. Only certain types of nodes can become master nodes – they include nodes launched both by the UMI team and their numerous partners from different countries, while any user can launch a validator node. Validator nodes monitor the work of the master nodes, and if the suspicious actions are detected, the unscrupulous masters are automatically disconnected from the system.

Along with the distribution of power among master nodes and validator nodes, another mechanism which is designed to prevent centralization is planned to be implemented in the UMI system in the future – integration with Proof-of-Stake consensus.

The UMI blockchain will continue to operate on the PoA algorithm, but if any problems with the master nodes arise, the system will automatically switch to the reserve PoS consensus.

Even if all of the masternodes suddenly stop functioning, the performance of the UMI network and its ability to conduct transactions will not be affected. PoS nodes do not need computing equipment to work, a regular laptop is enough. Any UMI user who has installed a desktop wallet with a validator node will be able to launch a backup PoS node.

Moreover, staking works on a smart contract in the UMI system, which means that the staker does not need to keep the computer on all the time. Thanks to staking on a smart contract, you can generate new UMI coins: up to 40% per month in 24h mode. With such a profitable economic model, UMI encourages users to actively join the system. This model is one of the features that allows UMI to avoid commissions for transfers – staking participants are interested in developing the ecosystem without additional incentives, such as commissions.

Smart contracts

The UMI blockchain allows you to create many specialized multifunctional smart contracts, including those suitable for integration into e-commerce services or for launching decentralized autonomous organizations (DAOs). These include various decentralized finance (DeFi) services.

Areas of application for the UMI blockchain smart contracts:

  • Decentralized exchanges and applications;
  • DeFi protocols, including Yield Farming and lending;
  • Online stores;
  • Crowdfunding platforms;
  • Gambling sites;
  • Gaming platforms;
  • Cashback and bonus programs;
  • and many other services.

Thanks to its high capacity, the UMI network will ensure the smooth operation of large DeFi projects, decentralized exchanges (DEX) or decentralized applications (DApps), and users will not face unprecedented high transaction fees, as it happened before with the Ethereum network.

Thus, the launch of UMI-based DeFi services will not have a negative impact on those who use the system exclusively for money transfers.

Staking in detail

Currently, UMI coins can be mined in two staking structures (pools) – ROY Club and ISP Club. In order to start mining, you need to create a personal wallet in the UMI blockchain and transfer a certain amount of UMI coins to your address.

Create UMI

Create UMI

After replenishing the wallet address, you can place your coins for staking in two pools. Unlike other staking systems, coins in the UMI system do not get frozen after joining a pool. They remain in the user’s wallet and no one can access them except the owner. Staking rewards accrue 24/7. The user can withdraw and sell them at any time.

structures UMI

You can buy UMI coins via the SIGEN.pro trading platform, which includes an exchange, an automatic exchanger and a p2p platform. According to the statistics, the daily trading volume of UMI ranges from $ 250,000 to $ 300,000, and the liquidity of the order book for buying coins has already exceeded $ 3.2 million, taking into account the p2p-platform. For the project that was launched only four months ago, the numbers look very promising. The interest in UMI on the market is indirectly evidenced by the rapidly growing number of active users: their number exceeded 47,000.

Mobile apps

Thanks to high-quality and fast mobile apps, users can perform all key operations using a smartphone or tablet. The applications for Android or iOS can be downloaded from Google Play and App Store, respectively.

mobile apps UMI

UMI mobile apps offer a wide list of functions. One can create and manage one or several UMI wallets, receive and send coins, connect to staking structures, view the history of transactions and get in touch with technical support.

The applications provide the ability to authorize using Face ID, fingerprint or PIN-code.

You can find all the latest information about the UMI project in the blog.

Technology

Africa’s Rise in Technology is Unstoppable—Sanwo-Olu

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rise in technology is unstoppable

By Modupe Gbadeyanka

The Governor of Lagos State, Mr Babajide Sanwo-Olu, has declared that Africa’s rise in technology is unstoppable, noting that his state will continue to play a prominent role in the ecosystem.

The Lagos Governor made this declaration at the GITEX Africa Digital Summit in Morocco, where the state government sponsored 25 startups in partnership with the Dubai World Trade Centre to demonstrate its commitment to fostering innovation and entrepreneurship.

GITEX Africa Morocco is Africa’s largest and most influential tech and startup event, renowned for showcasing technological advancements, innovations, and digital transformation.

The event provided a platform for Nigerian startups to pitch their ideas, connect with investors, and network with industry leaders on a global scale.

The small firms sponsored by the state government included Pocket Food, Access Tech, Printivo, Startup Lagos, Eko Institute of Technology, Kirgawa, Qore, Imperial EdTech, Bunce, Etaps, and Innovia Labs.

Mr Sanwo-Olu, who also attended the summit with the delegation, highlighted the remarkable growth of Africa’s tech start-up sector and emphasised that Nigerian tech start-ups surpassed the $4 billion mark in 2022, with Lagos playing a leading role in the continent’s digital transformation.

He said that from Nairobi to Cape Town and Rwanda to Morocco, the continent was emerging as a global tech hub, attracting local and international investments.

He then called for continued collaboration between the public and private sectors to harness Africa’s limitless potential.

GITEX Africa Morocco brings together the brightest minds, entrepreneurs, and investors worldwide to explore Africa’s rapidly advancing tech landscape.

With a focus on AI, Cybersecurity, Fintech, Cloud Computing, and Connectivity, the event offers invaluable insights and opportunities to shape inclusive digital societies and drive technological advancements across various sectors.

The Special Adviser to the Governor of Lagos, Tunbosun Alake; the Commissioner for Science and Technology, Mr Hakeem Fahm; and the Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Science and Technology, Mrs Ibilola Kasunmu, were among the delegation.

The Lagos team and startups were also supported by the Eko Innovation Centre, an innovation hub focused on driving the growth of startups and promoting digital transformation in Nigeria.

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Stakeholders Anticipate Emurgo Africa’s State of Web 3.0 in Africa Report

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Emurgo Africa

By Modupe Gbadeyanka

All is now set for unveiling the State of Web 3.0 in Africa report by a dynamic blockchain technology company, Emurgo Africa.

The study, the first on the continent, aims to fill a knowledge gap by examining the potential of these technologies to advance social and economic development in Africa.

It presents a detailed view of the current landscape and prospects of Web 3.0 technologies in the region, featuring real-world use cases, possibilities and obstacles connected with their adoption.

It was gathered that work explored various aspects of Web 3.0, such as decentralized finance (DeFi), blockchain technology, digital identity, smart contracts, and data privacy.

It also looked into the regulatory environment, infrastructure, and access to technology in the target nations, identifying areas for development that will facilitate the growth and adoption of Web 3.0 technologies.

The chief executive of Emurgo Africa, Mr Ahmed M. Amer, while commenting on the reports, which would be released on June 23, 2023, at a media conference in Nairobi, Kenya, said, “The future of Web 3.0 technologies in Africa is bright, with the potential to drive unprecedented social, financial and economic development across the continent.

“This report emphasizes the critical importance of collaboration between stakeholders, policymakers, and regulators in fully realizing the transformative power of Web 3.0 technologies in Africa.”

Expected at the unveiling are industry leaders, policymakers and the press, as well as key figures from prominent blockchain investors, developers and ecosystem players, including NODO, CVVC, GreenHouse Capital, PwC and Cardano.

Web 3.0 technologies are gradually becoming popular in Africa, and this report by Emurgo Africa will highlight the rapidly-evolving landscape, providing an in-depth analysis of their impact, opportunities, and challenges and offering recommendations for fostering growth and measurable impact.

The system can potentially bring transformative change to industries such as trade and industry, financial services and lending, supply chain management and logistics and healthcare provision and accessibility.

Factors such as regulatory clarity, infrastructure development, and collaboration between stakeholders will play a significant role in these technologies’ widespread use and successful implementation.

Key findings from the report include the immense opportunities for the African continent through the adoption of Web 3.0 technologies, a staggering 1,668 per cent increase in investment in blockchain technology in Africa between 2021 and 2022, and the crucial importance of collaboration between industry stakeholders, policymakers, and regulators in fostering an environment conducive to the growth of Web 3.0 technologies.

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Nigeria, Others Break Pledge Not to Impose Internet Restrictions

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impose internet restrictions Surfshark

By Adedapo Adesanya

A new study showed that Nigeria was among those that pledged to uphold free Internet according to a 2021 United Nations resolution but yet imposed restrictions.

The UN resolution on human rights on the internet aims to protect and promote human rights online, but some supporting countries have broken their word, according to a study by Cybersecurity company Surfshark, analysing UN countries’ stances in the 2021 UN Human Rights Council (HRC) Resolution on the promotion, protection, and enjoyment of human rights on the internet.

It was conducted by comparing countries’ stances with data from Surfshark’s Internet Shutdown Tracker, Surfshark was able to identify 5 African countries that claimed to support the resolution but “broke their word” by imposing internet restrictions.

On Nigeria’s end, it had one ongoing restriction at the time of the resolution’s adoption but has had no new restrictions since then.

Nigeria had banned Twitter a month before the adoption, and the restriction lasted until January 2022.

The federal government suspended Twitter on June 4, 2021, after it removed a post from President Muhammadu Buhari that threatened to punish regional secessionists.

The FG told the nation’s telecommunication companies to block access to users in Nigeria, leading users to fall to the use of Virtual Private Networks (VPNs). It was not until January 13, 2022, that the suspension was lifted.

Other African countries that supported the 2021 UN resolution but “broke their word” were Sudan, Burkina Faso, Mauritania, and Somalia.

The report noted that Sudan has “broken its word” the most in Africa, with nine internet disruptions that took place after the country supported the 2021 resolution, the first one happening amid the 2021 military coup.

Burkina Faso comes in second, with four restrictions since the resolution’s adoption in 2021. The country’s 2022 restriction on Facebook is still in place today. Mauritania and Somalia both had one internet restriction since supporting the resolution. Mauritania restricted mobile internet amid a prison riot, and Somalia had an internet blackout after the parliament voted to remove the prime minister.

Speaking on this, Gabriele Racaityte-Krasauske, Surfshark spokeswoman, said, “In today’s world, internet shutdowns have become a major concern. Authoritarian governments frequently employ them as a means to manipulate the public and stifle free speech. The UN resolution on human rights on the internet aims to make countries openly condemn these shutdowns and other ways of restricting online speech.”

“However, it’s concerning that even though 5 African countries publicly supported the resolution, they still imposed internet restrictions. It’s important to promote an open and accessible internet and pressure countries to uphold their commitments regarding human rights online,” she said.

Nine countries from other continents also “broke their word”: India, Cuba, Uzbekistan, Pakistan, Russia, Brazil, Armenia, Indonesia, and Ukraine.

Surfshark’s Internet Shutdown Tracker reveals that there were a total of 58 internet disruptions in these 14 countries during or after the adoption of the resolution.

India stands out as the country that has “broken its word” the most, with 19 internet disruptions since the resolution’s adoption in 2021, adding that if it included the Jammu and Kashmir region, this number would be even higher.

The Human Rights Council convenes at least three regular sessions annually. The upcoming 53rd session is scheduled for the summer of 2023.

“While the agenda of the specific resolution is currently unknown, Surfshark will keep an eye out for any updates regarding upcoming UN resolutions on human rights on the internet,” the firm noted.

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